“"Mira, mamá! Sin manos!". Can speech recognition tools be soundly applied for L2 speaking practice?” FLEAT VI, August 11-15 at Harvard University

How to easily rearrange your sections via the headings in MS-Word’s Navigation Pane

  1. Short answer Show Navigation (from ribbon ./ View), then Drag&drop/
  2. word-navigation-pane-drag-headings
  3. Maybe obvious, but had escaped me so far – I thought such ease would only come only with outline view  – what a great feature!

Which UML diagram types are in most demand?

  1. From a recent spot check of over 500 job postings on Indeed.com that mention both “UML” and “diagram”, the following picture emerges:
  2. There is clearly a Big 4 of UML diagram types, and they are  – in order of frequency –
    1. sequence,
    2. use-case,
    3. activity and
    4. (the only structural diagram type that “counts”) class diagram.
  3. UML Diagram Type Count of type
    activity 19.33%
    class 15.33%
    communication 6.00%
    component 2.67%
    interaction 1.33%
    network-architecture 1.33%
    object 2.00%
    sequence 23.33%
    state 8.00%
    timing 0.67%
    use-case 20.00%
    Grand Total 100.00%
  4. It seems you could in practice cover “80%’ of UML with these four diagram types. Even state and communication  (collaboration) diagrams are an already very distant 5th and 6th (but get you up to a coverage of about 95%).
  5. Notably, the majority of UML diagram types – at least in this sample set – do not figure at all:
Count of type Diagram
0 Behavioral state machine
0 Collaboration use
0 Composite structure
0 Deployment
0 Information flow
0 Interaction overview
0 Internal structure
0 Manifestation
0 Model
0 Package
0 Profile
0 Protocol state machine

Note: The vast majority of mentions did not need any, but I attempted some translations of the raw data on indeed.com:

indeed.com counted as
action activity
collaboration (1) communication (2)
data flow information flow
domain model class diagram
object models object
state charts state machine
process flow 1 not counted
swim lane sequence
prototypes 1 not counted
Categories: service-is-documenting Tags:

How to ease editing work in MS-Word by automating search/replace operations

  1. If you frequently have to edit documents according to a large number of editorial rules and regulations
  2. and if you can partially automate these edit operations  (or at least highlight suspicious passages for human review) with Word’s search/replace,
  3. I can recommend an add-in that can automate even the repeated search/replace operations (like the 57 in the video below)
  4. and even help you manage your search/replace strings and regular expressions in a spreadsheet which it can load from:
  5. Greg Maxey’s VBA Find & Replace Word Add-in. See it in action (click for full size):
  6. vbareplace
  7. Two Three Caveats: :
    1. At this point, I cannot get the add-in to work only in Word 2010. Even if I lower Macro security and allow programmatic access to the VBA project, when trying to launch the add-in from the ribbon, Word 2013 complains: “The macro cannot be found or has been disabled due to your macro security settings”:image.
    2. The automation is only as good as your underlying search/replace operations. (Hint: “Some people, when confronted with a problem, think ‘I know, I’ll use regular expressions.’ Now they have two problems.”)
    3. I think I will refrain from search/replace during “Tracking changes” – as in the video – , and rather use “Compare documents” after the replace operations – too many quirks otherwise…

How to define your own conditional content marker “Internal” for Doxygen

  1. Doxygen comes with a built-in conditional content marker \internal the outputting of which can be controlled with the switch INTERNAL_DOCS in Doxygen’s config file.
  2. However, I could not get this to work as advertised in Doxygen 1.8.8.
  3. In cases of similar feature breakage, users are commonly advised to fix the error in the Doxygen source. If you, like I did, lack the time for that, here is a simple workaround which uses another built-in feature that an be controlled via  Doxygen’s config file:
  4. Define as one of the:
    ALIASES = "myinternal=\if myinternal <HR><kbd><em>" \
              "endmyinternal= </em></kbd> \endif"
    # HTML is optional, intended to make internal information stand out clearly if outputted
  5. Switch this ALIAS on and off using ENABLED_SECTIONS       = # myinternal
  6. Example usage in a .dox file:
    -# A high-low-high-low beep sequence followed by a low-high beep
     sequence indicates successful pairing and connection to the remote
     device.
     @myinternal tested with barcode on lower-end of cradle: gives success
     beep sequence @endmyinternal
     -# A long low, long high beep sequence indicates unsuccessful pairing.

     

Doxygen config reformatted for Excel

  1. Apart from the almost 150 markup tags Doxygen 1.1. supports (not to mention HTML tags that are supported also),
  2. the Doxygen config file in version 1.8.8 has over 260 settings, many with complex interrelations.
  3. To facilitate working with so many options, especially when testing. I reformatted the default config file for import into Excel,
  4. where I can more easily sort, search and filter,
  5. and export columns L-R whenever I need to update the doxygen.config file: image

Below is a live, downloadable view:

Paper on use of “Speech recognition Tools for Oral Proficiency” training has appeared in this week’s FLTMag.com

  1. Since I have been asked to advertise this: Smiley
  2. image
    1. These Speech recognition tools, while an invaluable partial evaluation automation or AI tool, come free with MS-Windows (7 Enterprise/Ultimate, 8 all distributions) – crucial for often resource-strapped language learning environments.
    2. The tools do not come with pre-built exercises – a blessing in disguise since this makes them easier to integrate  them with your existing textbook-based syllabus. I provide some ideas how you can easily derive speech recognition exercises from your syllabus/textbooks.
  3. I recommend having a look at the entire new issue of FLTMag, the magazine on technology integration in the world language classroom, which
    1. examines other software that supports second language learning with video conferencing, support for writing and vocabulary learning (on tablets versus print materials) ,
    2. reviews a book on “Ideas for integrating technology in the classroom” 
    3. and advertises upcoming conferences.  Hope to see you there.
Categories: research Tags:
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